In Memory of Spc. Nicholas Peters and the other Kelly Park boys

Somerville, Mass, June 28, 2008–

The rules are simple enough for the kids playing in the stickball tournament this morning in Kelly Park: There are to be three people to a team. There are four innings per game. Two outs per inning. You walk on three balls. You strike out on two strikes. The second strike can be a foul ball.

Any ground ball not stopped or caught is a single. If you hit the ball over the double court line without it being caught or stopped, you have hit a double. If you smack the ball hard off the fence, you have a triple. And if you hit the ball entirely over the fence, of course, you have hit a home run. If you hit a deep foul ball over the fence, it is unclear whether it is to be counted as a foul ball or home run. In that case, the final decision is left to the whim of a grown up or the good will of the opposing team.

If you are eleven years old, and get a chance to bat, there are traditions to maintain: You must wear an oversized Red Sox jersey with the name Papelbon on the back. (That is the Sox’s closer for those not literate in such things. In an earlier time your jersey would have had the name Garciappara on it.) You dramatically roll your head from side to side to get the hair out of the eyes. Then you check the stick to make sure you are hitting at the ball from the right end. (This is very important; however, you hope that nobody sees you doing this.) Then you dig hard into the pavement with your converse high tops, lean way way back on your heels, and then smack at the ball—eyes closed allowed—with all of your eleven year old might. Whether you hit the ball or not, all is right with the world.

You hope you hit the ball of course. But if you don’t, you still get to have your face painted, hang with the older kids, have a hot dog with anything you want it on it– and then if you are really, really lucky you get to sit on your big brother’s shoulder to watch the dedication of the square to an older boy in the neighborhood.

The corner of Cragie and Summer is to be renamed in dedication for another little boy who once played stick ball in this park. There are two honor guards, one of which will fire off live rounds, interrupting the morning quiet and send singing birds scattering. A representative of the mayor will say a few words.

This is the unveiling of the new street sign dedicating Spc. Nicholas Peters Square.

Nick served a tour of duty in Iraq and came home in one piece. He survived the war but not the peace. Stationed at Ft. Hood, in Texas, someone in a bar did not like the fact that he was wearing a Red Sox jersey, and killed him.

Days after his killing, his baseball coach would say: “I can still see a 6 year old Nick skating at the rink and at 8 years old hitting a baseball.” Nick’s little niece, her mother, Shanna, told me the morning of the stickball tournament, still sees Nick all the time. She declares to her mom: “Uncle is laughing at you!” One day while coloring, she nonchalantly orders: “Uncle! Color in the lines!”

Who is to tell her that she is wrong to believe that her uncle is still with her?

When Nick was buried in a flag draped coffin, he was not buried in his military uniform. He was proud of being a soldier, but did not want to be known or remembered only for being a soldier. It was duty and service for him. But he did not want to be singled out for it. When he was told that he could watch a New England Patriots game from the sidelines if he were to wear his uniform, he said he would much rather dress in his civilian clothes and watch from the stands, his sister Shanna told me.

He had told his family before he left for the war that he did not want to be buried in his military uniform but rather in his Red Sox jersey. Nobody gave it a second thought after his tour of duty was over. Who could have thought that he would be killed at home or for the way he was dressed?

The stickball tournament in not just in honor of Nick, but also his friend, David Martini, who played stickball and baseball and hockey with Nick, and who too has died too young. David was family to Nick’s family and vice versa. Shanna, Nick’s sister, wanted Nick’s day to be David’s too.

All together, four other boys who played stickball with Nicholas Peters in Kelly Park have died too young deaths—the result of senseless violence, suicide, or drug overdoses. Casualties of an invisible war at home like the one in Iraq that has also been disappearing from our media.

When I return home from Somerville to Washington D.C., I find out that my friend Brian has been shot on the street because apparently the two kids robbing him did not think he was willing to hand over his cell phone fast enough. Even though he is shot three times, he is alright—although with one less spleen.

Unable to sleep, I go online and watch over and over again Bobby Kennedy’s speech on the menace of violence in America which he gave on April 5, 1968: “The victims of the violence are black and white, rich and poor, young and old famous and unknown. They are most important of all human beings whom other human beings loved and needed. No one can be certain who suffer next from senseless act of violence. And yet it goes on and on and on…

“Whenever any American’s life is taken by another American unnecessarily… Whenever we tear a the fabric of he lives which some other man has painfully and clumsily woven for himself and his children—whenever we do this—the nation is degraded.”

The next morning I have to go visit Brian in the hospital to see with my own eyes that Brian is all right. He smiles, banters with friends, nods off, and we are all reassured.

But what amazes everyone is that despite being shot three times, Brian ran quite an entire block and a half away to put some distance between him and the shooter before the police and EMTs could arrive. It makes no sense and perfect sense. He wanted to get to a safe place.

My thoughts return to that eleven year old kid playing in the stickball tournament. You want him to be safe. You think maybe you should have a heart to heart and tell him that when he gets older all that he has to do is not wear that Red Sox jersey certain places. If only it were that simple.

Below here is a video of Bobby Kennedy’s speech. Please watch and comment. And for more, here is a Huffington Post column.

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12 Responses to In Memory of Spc. Nicholas Peters and the other Kelly Park boys

  1. richard says:

    bless you
    JOHN MARTIN and BOBBIE

  2. Dan says:

    Violence seems to be the easy solution but if one would simply listen to the many healing voices of humanity…well…maybe someday the faith in one another will be greater then hate, hope for a better tomorrow for the children will be the vision and above all love will be the path we shall all walk upon…thoughts and prayers and thank you for sharing – Bobby’s word continueto touch my soul.

  3. Tony Barhorst says:

    Thank you RFK for giving us a record of fine speeches and actions. RFK gave a great speech in Indianapolis the day before to a black crowd. Indy was a city unlike others that did not riot that night.

  4. sully18 says:

    Violence is fostered in the American family where adherence to blind obedience,loyalty without question,and spiritual murder are treated as rules rather than the “poisonous pedagogy” that they are.How else would we have allowed the criminals who run and are ruining this country to gain and to stay in power?The same dynamic that allowed Hitler to do what he did is alive and well in America.Until we take action to cleanse ourselves of this malignancy we will continue to witness our loved brothers and sisters die.

  5. Rey Buono says:

    So many children dead — so many in Iraq.

  6. Mike says:

    The words of RFK apply perfectly to what is Israel is doing to the natives of Palestine!

  7. anton says:

    as well loved and perceived as jack was….i’ve always belived that the greatest loss to our country and it’s future, was the loss of bobby….truly he was a man with a soul of the people….

  8. a perone says:

    THERE ARE TIMES WHEN LOSSES LIKE BOBBY ARE SIMPLY TOO GREAT FOR US TO BEAR. THAT NIGHT AT THE AMBASSADOR, WE ALL BECAME A LITTLE LESS.

  9. PlacitasRoy says:

    What a magnificent video – thanks so much for the link.

  10. shanna says:

    very very nic wirte up. My family is thankfull for the poeple like you that understand this has to come to and end.

  11. cb says:

    murray, i’m a huge fan and was going to link to this but it’s it’s papelbon, i link to this and people see that in the first line and you’ll be ridiculed.

  12. Bertha says:

    This post was very interesting. I was just thinking about some of these things last week so it’s great to see other people thinking along the same lines.

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